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4 posts tagged with "image processing"

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· 5 min read
Doug Sillars

In our initial image processing workflow using Netflix Conductor, we initially built a workflow that takes one image, resizes it and uploads it to S3.

In our 2nd post, we utilized a fork to create two images in parallel. When building this workflow, we reused all of the tasks from the first workflow, connecting them in a way that allowing for parallel processing of two images at once.

In both of these workflows, two tasks are reused: image_convert_resize and upload_toS3. This is one great advantage of using microservices - we create the service once, and reuse it many times in different ways.

In this post, we'll take that abstraction a step further, and replace the tasks in the two forks with a SUB_WORKFLOW. This allows us to simplify the full workflow by abstracting a frequently used set of tasks into a single task.

· 5 min read
Doug Sillars

In recent posts, we have built several image processing workflows with Conductor. In our first post, we created an image processing workflow for one image - where we provide an image along with the desired output dimensions and format. The workflow output a link on Amazon S3 to the desired file.

In the 2nd example, we used the FORK System task to create multiple images in parallel. The number of images was hardcoded in the workflow - as FORK generates exactly as many paths as are coded into the workflow.

As number of images is hardcoded in the workflow - only 2 images are created. When it comes to image generation, there is often a need for more images (as new formats become popular) or sizes - as more screens are supported.

Luckily, Conductor supports this flexibility, and has a feature to specify the number of tasks to be created at runtime. In this post, we'll demonstrate the use of dynamic forks, where the workflow splitting is done at runtime.

Learn how to create a dynamic fork workflow in this post!

· 8 min read
Doug Sillars

In our previous post on image processing workflows, we built a Netflix Conductor workflow that took an image input, and then ran 2 tasks: The first task resizes and reformats the image, and the second task uploads the image to an AWS S3 bucket.

With today's varied screen sizes, and varied browser support, it is a common requirement that the image processing pipeline must create multiple images with different sizes and formats of each image.

To do this with a Conductor workflow, we'll utilize the FORK operation to create parallel processes to generate multiple versions of the same image. The FORK task creates multiple parallel processes, so each image will be created asynchronously - ensuring a fast and efficient process.

In this post, our workflow will create 2 versions of the same image - a jpg and webp.

· 9 min read
Doug Sillars

There are many tools available to work with images - resizing, changing the format, cropping, changing colors, etc. Tools like Photoshop require a lot of manual work to create image. Online tools for image processing are also extremely popular. But, rather than doing the work manually, or paying for a service to modify your images, wouldn't it be cool to have a workflow that does image resizing for you automatically? In this post, we'll build just this using Conductor to orchestrate the microservices involved, and to create an API-like surface for image processing.

In this post, we'll run Conductor locally on your computer. The Conductor workflow consists of two tasks. The first task reads in an image and resizes it according to the parameters provided (labeled "image_convert_resize_ref" in the image below). The second task ("image_toS3_ref" below) takes the resized image and saves the it to an Amazon S3 bucket.

Diagram of our image processing workflow

Using a microservice architecture for this process allows for easy swapping of components, and allows for easy extension of the workflow - easily adding additional image processing steps (or even swapping in and out different processes for different workflows). We could also easily change the location of the saved file based on different parameters.